COURSE OUTLINE FOR CREDIT COURSE

Basic Course Information

Courses numbered 1 - 49 are remedial or college preparatory courses which do not apply toward an A. A. Degree and are not intended for transfer. Courses numbered 50-99 apply toward an AA Degree, but are not intended for transfer. Courses numbered 100 and higher apply toward an AA Degree and/or are intended for transfer to a four-year college or university.

Discipline: GEOG
Course Number: 143
Title: Introduction to Cartography and Computer Mapping

Units and Hours

Units: 1.00
Grade Option: Grade/Pass/No Pass
Course Length in Weeks: Min Weeks - 16 Max Weeks - 18
Min Semester Hours
Hour Type
Hours
Min Semester Hours
Max Semester Hours
Lecture Category
1.00
16.00
18.00
Lab Category
0.00
0.00
0.00
Subtotal
1.00
16.00
18.00
Out of Class Hour
2.00
32.00
36.00
Totals
3.00
48.00
54.00
Max Semester Hours
Hour Type
Hours
Min Semester Hours
Max Semester Hours
Max Lecture Category
1.00
16.00
18.00
Max Lab Category
0.00
0.00
0.00
Max Subtotal
1.00
16.00
18.00
Max Out of Class Hour
2.00
32.00
36.00
Max Totals
3.00
48.00
54.00

Grading Basis: Grade/Pass/No Pass
Basic Skills Requirements: Appropriate Language and/or Computational Skills.

Requisites

To satisfy a prerequisite, the student must have earned a letter grade of A, B, C or P(Pass) in the prerequisite course, unless otherwise stated.

Prerequisite: GEOG 120
Corequisite (Course required to be taken concurrently): None
Prerequisite: (Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in): None
Recommended Preparation: None
Limitation on Enrollment (e.g. Performance tryout or audition): None

Catalog Description

Provides the technical and design skills needed to create an effective map using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students will receive a review on map projection, coordinate systems, and datum transformation issues. In addition, students will learn about map templates, map annotations, and other tools that are used to enhance spatial data presentation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:
  1. Students should be able to list at least three critical map elements in a well designed map.
  2. Students should be able to list the four possible types of distortion produced during the map projection process.

Specific Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:
  1. Create well-balanced, well-focused maps.
  2. Clearly explain the differences between different map types.
  3. Create and utilize industry-specific map templates.
  4. Optimize cartographic effectiveness by setting map display scales.
  5. Maximize clarity in spatial data presentation through the use of dynamic labels and annotations.
  6. Understand, create, and modify industry-specific map symbologies.

Methods of Instruction

Methods of Instruction may include, but are not limited to, the following
  1. Lecture
  2. Other (Specify)
  3. Discussion
  4. Learning Modules
Other Method(s)
Student will be required to complete a semester project and a map gallery presentation.

Content in Terms of Specific Body of Knowledge

  1. Structure of Geographic Information
    1. Spatial and attribute information
      1. Vector and raster
      2. Attribute data types
    2. Map scale
    3. Datum, projections, and coordinate systems
      1. Geographic coordinate systems
      2. Projected coordinate systems
  2. Cartography and Visual Perception Theories
    1. Map types
      1. Reference maps
      2. Thematic maps
    2. Classification techniques
      1. Equal intervals
      2. Natural breaks
      3. Quantile
      4. Standard deviation
      5. Manual
    3. Colors and map symbology
    4. Map generalizations
    5. Map layout
    6. Intellectual hierarchy
    7. Visual hierarchy
  3. Tools in Computer Mapping
    1. Dynamic labels, interactive labels, and annotations
    2. Layer files and map templates
      1. Customizing and importing map symbols
      2. Creating basemaps
    3. Internet mapping and WebGIS
      1. Web maps
      2. Web applications

Textbooks/Resources

Textbooks
  1. Law, Michael. ESRI Map Book. 30th ESRI Press, 2015.
  2. Krygier, John; Wood, Denis. Making Maps: A Visual Guide to Map Design for GIS. 2nd Guilford Press, 2011.
  3. Tyner, Judith. Principles of Map Design. The Guilford Press, 2014.

Assignments

Required Reading:
Students are required to read various trade publications and journal articles regarding advances in computer mapping tools and visual perception theories.

Required Writing:
Students will complete a total of 6 learning modules throughout the course. They will be required to produce concise and well-written critiques to maps that they have perused. Furthermore, student must write clear recommendations needed to improve the layout and focus of the maps.

Critical Thinking:
Student will need to peruse and evaluate maps from various GIS related industries using cartographic criteria covered in the course readings.

Outside Assignments:
The final class project and map gallery presentation will require students to produce a series of maps with the appropriate scale, projection, symbologies, and other map elements. Moreover, students will need to use at least one of the computer tools (e.g. annotations) covered in the course in their projects.

Students are expected to spend a minimum of three hours per unit per week in class and on outside assignments, prorated for short-term classes.

Methods of Assessment

Methods of Assessment may include, but are not limited to, the following:
  1. Class Participation
  2. Class Work
  3. Demonstration
  4. Exams/Tests
  5. Oral Presentation
  6. Projects
  7. Quizzes
  8. Research Projects

Open Entry/Open Exit

Not Open Entry/Open Exit

Repeatability

Course is Repeatable for Reasons other than a Deficient Grade? No

Contact Person

Wing H. Cheung